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Civil Society Agency and the Right to Health (ongoing)

This is an ongoing project which aims to research a model for the operationalisation of the right to health in the context of a country with high levels of inequalities in health and the conditions needed for health but with high levels of institutional and historical commitments to human rights.

The outline of this project is to research a model for the operationalisation of the right to health in the context of a country with high levels of inequalities in health and the conditions needed for health but with high levels of institutional and historical commitments to human rights.  Evidence to date points to the importance of agency on the part of communities most vulnerable to the violation of their rights as key to redress of social inequalities.  This project investigates whether a human rights approach can help to mobilise the agency needed, individually and collectively, to overcome factors driving health inequalities, and help realise the right to health, and to explore what kinds of strategies are most effective, and the role that health care providers play in either facilitating or acting as obstacle to such agency. 

The network aims to share experiences of, and develop best practices for, engagement with health facilities on the right to health. The network is used to explore participants’ understanding and practice of human rights, the understanding and practice of human rights of health care providers with whom network members interact, and to how interaction between providers and community members can generate new models for realizing rights to health.

Activities conducted within the network include training on human rights and its relationship to health, reflection on participants’ experiences of the health services and attempts to claim rights and the development of materials on the right to health. The training happens in a participative spiral using meetings of the network to reflect on (a) needs identified previous sessions; (b) findings from research prompted by the needs previously identified; (c) further training priorities and research questions that emerge from this reflection to inform the work of the project team and the content of the next meeting. This participative approach underlies both training and research activities, which are therefore intimately interconnected, with data collection being used to inform the development of materials and identify training needs, and to monitor the impacts of both the training and the reflection process. As information emerges from the process and is collectively reflected upon, the need for specific investigations is identified, so further objectives or methods may be added.  Both qualitative and quantitative methods are be used to collect data. 

Outputs thus far have included health and human rights materials for training and advocacy (best practice), policy briefs, pamphlets for community use, conference presentations and publications. The long-term outcomes sought include greater effectiveness of community participation in health and models for better interaction between communities and health care facilities in realizing the right to health.

The outline of this project is to research a model for the operationalisation of the right to health in the context of a country with high levels of inequalities in health and the conditions needed for health but with high levels of institutional and historical commitments to human rights.  Evidence to date points to the importance of agency on the part of communities most vulnerable to the violation of their rights as key to redress of social inequalities.  This project investigates whether a human rights approach can help to mobilise the agency needed, individually and collectively, to overcome factors driving health inequalities, and help realise the right to health, and to explore what kinds of strategies are most effective, and the role that health care providers play in either facilitating or acting as obstacle to such agency. 

The network will aim to share experiences of, and develop best practices for, engagement with health facilities on the right to health. The network will be used to explore participants’ understanding and practice of human rights, the understanding and practice of human rights of health care providers with whom network members interact, and to how interaction between providers and community members can generate new models for realizing rights to health.

Activities conducted within the network will include training on human rights and its relationship to health, reflection on participants’ experiences of the health services and attempts to claim rights and the development of materials on the right to health. The training happens in a participative spiral using meetings of the network to reflect on (a) needs identified previous sessions; (b) findings from research prompted by the needs previously identified; (c) further training priorities and research questions that emerge from this reflection to inform the work of the project team and the content of the next meeting. This participative approach underlies both training and research activities, which are therefore intimately interconnected, with data collection being used to inform the development of materials and identify training needs, and to monitor the impacts of both the training and the reflection process. As information emerges from the process and is collectively reflected upon, the need for specific investigations is identified, so further objectives or methods may be added.  Both qualitative and quantitative methods are be used to collect data. 

Outputs thus far have included health and human rights materials for training and advocacy (best practice), policy briefs, pamphlets for community use, conference presentations and publications. The long-term outcomes sought include greater effectiveness of community participation in health and models for better interaction between communities and health care facilities in realizing the right to health.  - See more at: http://www.salearningnetwork.uct.ac.za/sln/projects#sthash.AEhJQ3Yx.dpuf
The outline of this project is to research a model for the operationalisation of the right to health in the context of a country with high levels of inequalities in health and the conditions needed for health but with high levels of institutional and historical commitments to human rights.  Evidence to date points to the importance of agency on the part of communities most vulnerable to the violation of their rights as key to redress of social inequalities.  This project investigates whether a human rights approach can help to mobilise the agency needed, individually and collectively, to overcome factors driving health inequalities, and help realise the right to health, and to explore what kinds of strategies are most effective, and the role that health care providers play in either facilitating or acting as obstacle to such agency. 

The network will aim to share experiences of, and develop best practices for, engagement with health facilities on the right to health. The network will be used to explore participants’ understanding and practice of human rights, the understanding and practice of human rights of health care providers with whom network members interact, and to how interaction between providers and community members can generate new models for realizing rights to health.

Activities conducted within the network will include training on human rights and its relationship to health, reflection on participants’ experiences of the health services and attempts to claim rights and the development of materials on the right to health. The training happens in a participative spiral using meetings of the network to reflect on (a) needs identified previous sessions; (b) findings from research prompted by the needs previously identified; (c) further training priorities and research questions that emerge from this reflection to inform the work of the project team and the content of the next meeting. This participative approach underlies both training and research activities, which are therefore intimately interconnected, with data collection being used to inform the development of materials and identify training needs, and to monitor the impacts of both the training and the reflection process. As information emerges from the process and is collectively reflected upon, the need for specific investigations is identified, so further objectives or methods may be added.  Both qualitative and quantitative methods are be used to collect data. 

Outputs thus far have included health and human rights materials for training and advocacy (best practice), policy briefs, pamphlets for community use, conference presentations and publications. The long-term outcomes sought include greater effectiveness of community participation in health and models for better interaction between communities and health care facilities in realizing the right to health.  - See more at: http://www.salearningnetwork.uct.ac.za/sln/projects#sthash.AEhJQ3Yx.dpuf